The European Institute’s Roundtable on Telecommunications, Information Technology and Media Policies provides a transatlantic forum for government and industry principals to address the wide range of critical issues affecting the ever-changing information society and its infrastructure. Global communication demands increased cooperation between the European Union and the United States to develop effective policies that stimulate scientific and technological innovation, promote systemic and regulatory compatibility, enhance competition, build consensus on internet governance, and address privacy concerns.

Through participation in the Roundtable, members are given unique access to leading U.S. and European policymakers and an insight into initiatives before they become policy. Members use the Roundtable to analyze emerging technologies, identify specific areas of common ground and promote creative policy solutions.

Recent Meetings

Dr. Jacques Bus, Head of Unit, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for Trust and Security, DG Information Society at the European Commission outlined the European Union’s research priorities in seeking to ensure the security of critical infrastructures and networks, including the Internet. Presenting a U.S. perspectives were: Dr. David Boyd, Director, Command, Control, and Interoperability Division, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Andy Purdy, former Acting Director of the National Cyber Security Division/US-CERT of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and current President of DRA Enterprises, Inc.; and Dr. Herbert Lin, Chief Scientist on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. Roger Cochetti, Group Director for U.S. Public Policy at Computing Technology Industry Association moderated the discussion.

Jean-François Bureau, Assistant Secretary General for Public Diplomacy, NATO discussed NATO’s new strategic concepts as it looks ahead to the 2009 summit, which include prevention of terrorism and maritime awareness, cyber-defense, missile defense and energy security. He also discussed the significance of public diplomacy as NATO redefines its role in order to meet the new security challenges of the 21st century and transitions from a military defense organization into a broader regional security organization. H.E. Andreas Kakouris, Ambassador of Cyprus; H.E. Mark Miceli-Farrugia, Ambassador of Malta; H.E. Dominique Struye de Swielande, Ambassador of Belgium; and H.E. Adrian Vierita, Ambassador of Romania; as well as Gerald Pease, Executive Director, Department of Defense Policy Board on Federal Aviation Leo Michel, a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS), National Defense University moderated the meeting.

Peter Hustinx, European Data Protection Supervisor, addressed the transatlantic debate over data privacy, focusing on the EU’s existing data protection system and the risks posed by constant technological innovation as well as increased demands by law enforcement officials on both sides of the Atlantic for deeper and more immediate data exchanges. Paul Rosenzweig, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy, Department of Homeland Security, offered the U.S. perspective on building an effective law enforcement framework for the sharing of personal data. Yael Weinman, Counsel for International Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission gave the consumer protection aspect. The meeting was moderated by James Halpert, Partner, DLA Piper.

Dr. Isi Saragossi, Director of the European Commission’s “European Research Area: Knowledge-Based Economy” directorate, and Dr. Charles Wessner, Director of Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship at The National Academies in Washington, D.C. discussed the priorities of U.S. and European research policy and the challenges and opportunities for policy makers and the scientific communities. The discussion was moderated by Kathleen Kingscott, IBM Industry Chair and Visiting Professor, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University.

The European Institute convened the third in the continuing series of discussions about the transatlantic search for common standards in new technologies, internet governance and cyber security. Jacques Bus, Head of Unit ICT for Trust and Security of the European Commission stressed the importance of bringing researchers together from both sides of the Atlantic to improve cooperation. Offering a U.S. perspective, John Kropf, Director of International Privacy Programs, Privacy Office of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security suggested strategic development on the international level and filling in the gaps between the E.U. and U.S. The meeting was chaired by Donald Abelson of Sudbury International, LLC.

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