Transatlantic Approaches to Energy Security and Emerging Economies     Print Email
Monday, 26 March 2007

Held on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, the seminar focused on ways to enhance transatlantic approaches towards energy security and emerging economies. The German Presidency’s initiatives in this were outlined by Johannes Haindl, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Federal Republic of Germany. H.E. Janusz Reiter, Ambassador of Poland to the United States, indicated that an external energy supply is forcing the EU to make choices in energy security issues. Kenneth A. Myers III, Senior Professional Staff Member, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, opined that NATO has the most comprehensive approach towards energy policies. Matthew Bryza, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, U.S. Department of State, stressed public private partnerships in pipeline prospects, dependency on Russian energy, and gas flows from the Caspian Sea region into Europe. From an industry perspective, Tracey McMinn, Government Relations Advisor at Shell, gave an analysis of the energy demand and supply of emerging nations. The Hon. Andris Piebalgs, Commissioner for Energy, European Commission, highlighted the EU’s leadership on energy and climate policies, which can build an international consensus for combating climate change. As significant progress has been made during the Vienna E.U.-U.S. summit lasts year, there are more opportunities for transatlantic cooperation in the energy field. The discussion was moderated by Robert McNally, Managing Director of Tudor Investment Corporation.

 
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UMD Jean Monnet Research Project

The University of Maryland has received a Jean Monnet grant from the EU to conduct a series of policy exchanges between Europe and the US on filling infrastructure needs and the utility of public/private partnerships as the financing mechanism. If interested in participating in or receiving more information about these exchanges, please contact Rye McKenzie (rmckenzi@umd.edu).

New from the Bertelsmann Foundation

The Bertelsmann Foundation is an independent, nonpartisan and nonprofit think tank in Washington, DC with a transatlantic perspective on global challenges.

"Edge of a Precipice" by Nathan Crist

"Newpolitik" by Emily Hruban

 

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