EA July 2011

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RISING SUCCESS OF POPULIST PARTIES ROILS POLITICS ACROSS EUROPE

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This European Affairs article, written and going to press before last week’s tragic events in garretmartin
Norway, has been given a topical introduction to provide some context (without any prediction)
about the growth of populist parties in Europe.

 

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PALESTINIANS AND ISRAELIS MANEUVER FRANTICALLY ABOUT POSSIBLE UN VOTE RECOGNIZING PALESTINE

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Presidents, prime ministers and sundry other officials from the Middle East are frantically working on geoffpaulEuropean (and U.S.) officials this summer advocating for and against the proposed UN General Assembly vote this fall to accept Palestine as a member state in the world body.

 

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LIBYA AFTER GADDAFI: EUROPE'S LOOMING CHALLENGE

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If and when Gaddafi departs, the violent disorder that gripped Baghdadjohnherbstleomichel
after Saddam Hussein’s fall in 2003 risks being replayed in Tripoli and elsewhere. Hence, the international community should be prepared to assist Libya’s Transitional National Council to maintain basic security. But who, precisely, will lead the international community in this effort?

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NEW GLOBAL REALITIES OVERTAKE THE DOHA ROUND

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thaliabayleAlmost a decade after the launch of the Doha Round under the World Trade Organization (WTO), the negotiations are mired in complex deadlock and most experts believe that there is little chance of a significant pact being salvaged by year’s end. That is the effective deadline for this ill-starred round of trade talks since next year is election year in the U.S., never propitious for global trade talks.

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"THE GREATER JOURNEY: AMERICANS IN PARIS" BY DAVID McCULLOUGH

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How Paris Taught Modernity to 19th-Century America ------- In his new best-seller, a renowned and thegreaterjourney
popular American historian unearths and brings vividly to life a rich high point in France’s tradition of incubating the talents of Americans who go on to change their own nation’s destiny. His book fills a gap of neglect. Until now, Americans have generally viewed their nation’s cultural and intellectual debts to France as arising from two key periods – in the late 18th century and early part of the 20th century. The first involved the French role in the American revolution through military assistance to General George Washington and via the Enlightenment’s inspiration for the Founding Fathers’ revolutionary concept of freedom. The second period featured Paris as an artistic hot-house for expatriate American artists and writers such as Ernest Hemingway in the 1920s.

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