European Institute

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Homeland Security

Launched in 2002, The European Institute’s Transatlantic Roundtable on Cooperation in Homeland Security, examines the opportunities and challenges for Europeans and Americans to strengthen cooperation and generate innovative new policies to improve the protection of infrastructure, resources, and citizenry from the threat of international terrorism. This project has been instrumental in bringing together U.S. administration officials, representatives from the U.S. Congress, leaders in European governments and the European Union, corporate representatives, and policy experts to exchange views on these critical issues.

Although the United States and Europe stand together on many common threats, greater transatlantic cooperation is required in the war against terrorism. In today’s increasingly challenging environment, non-state actors pose a broad range of threats that cut across myriad sectors and undermine the free flow of people, goods and services that is at the heart of the transatlantic relationship. The urgency of comprehensive and mutually beneficial civil security is a priority in both Europe and the United States, and cooperative policies and engagement have direct implications for both continents. The European Institute’s program promotes sustained dialogue between representatives of government agencies and industry to facilitate multinational initiatives, improve levels of exchange between the public and private sectors, and generate new public/private partnerships.

Recent Meetings:


A European Digital Bill of Rights & the Future of Transatlantic Data Flows Print Email
03/26/14

On Wednesday, March 26, 2014, The European Institute held a discussion with The Honorable Claude Moraes, Member of the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and author of the groundbreaking European Parliament report on NSA and Member State surveillance activities released in January 2014.  Mr. Moraes focused his remarks on whether the EU and U.S. can reach concordance in data protection laws, the relevance of TTIP negotiations in this realm, as well as movements toward reform, not repeal, of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor program.  He emphasized that the EU and U.S. must work together to promote security while safeguarding transparency and citizens’ rights.

 
Data Protection, Privacy & Security: Re-Establishing Trust between Europe and the United States Print Email
10/29/13

On October 29, 2013, The European Institute in cooperation with the European Parliament Liaison Office with the U.S. Congress convened a breakfast discussion with The Honorable Jan Philipp Albrecht, Rapporteur for the EU Regulation on Data Protection on the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice & Home Affairs (LIBE) and Commissioner Julie Brill, U.S. Federal Trade Commissioner. The meeting focused on the implications of recently revealed NSA data collection and the surveillance of EU citizens for transatlantic cyber-security cooperation. Particular attention was paid to the sustainability of the Safe Harbor Agreement, the impact of the EU’s Regulation on Data Protection, which recently passed through the LIBE Committee, as well as the potential effects of the revelations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership initiative. The discussion was moderated by Jim Halpert, Partner at DLA Piper.

Click here to read Commissioner Brill's remarks.

 
Building a United States for Europe: A Discussion with Viviane Reding Print Email
04/05/13

On April 5, 2013, The European Institute hosted a discussion with Viviane Reding, Vice President of the European Commission and Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights, and Citizenship. Vice President Reding outlined the “ambitious and controversial” goal of a “United States of Europe” in which a federal political system would be of full measure with Europe’s global economic clout. Key would be the popular election of the European Commission President and the establishment of a bicameral legislature with one house representing E.U. member states and the second representing the people. Jacqueline Grapin, Founder and co-chair of the Board of Directors of The European Institute, offered opening remarks, noting that there was no one better to “address the institutional coordination and democratization” of the EU than Vice President Reding.

 
Transatlantic Cooperation on Cybersecurity: Perspectives on New EU and U.S. Initiatives Print Email
03/05/13

On March 5, 2013, The European Institute, in cooperation with the Embassy of Italy and the Delegation of the European Union, organized a discussion with Dr. Patrick Gallagher, U.S. Under Secretary of Commerce and Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and Giuseppe Abbamonte, Head of the Trust and Security Unit at DG CONNECT of European Commission, on transatlantic cooperation on cybersecurity. Luca Franchetti Pardo, Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy of Italy, offered welcoming remarks and stressed the importance that Italy and the EU attach to cybersecurity. As the EU continues to pursue a Digital Single Market, cyber-threats have become an urgent matter to be addressed. Both Dr. Gallagher and Mr. Abbamonte emphasized the importance of cybersecurity, the measures being taken to enhance it in the U.S. and the EU, and recognized the shared values as imperative for increased European-American cooperation in this field.

 
Transatlantic Cooperation in Stemming the Spread of Falsified Medications Print Email
10/25/12

On October 25, 2012, The European Institute, in cooperation with the Embassy of Belgium and the Embassy of Switzerland held a special seminar on transatlantic cooperation in stemming the spread of falsified medications.  Mark Witzal, Deputy Director of the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations presented the keynote address.  Panelists in the first session: Bernard Frahi, Vice President for Corporate Economic Security at Sanofi; Ambassador Richard Kauzlarich, Deputy Director at the Terrorism, Transnational Crime & Corruption Center and Adjunct Professor at George Mason University’s School of Public Policy; and Jeffrey Gren, Director of the Office of Health and Consumer Goods at the U.S. Department of Commerce discussed the security, economic and public health risks of falsified medications.  The panel was moderated by Susan Reardon, Director of International Policy, Worldwide Government Affairs and Policy at Johnson & Johnson.  Panelists in the second session: John Roth, Director of the Office of Criminal Investigations at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Patrick Byrne, Europol Senior Representative and Head of Europol Delegation at the Delegation of the European Union to the United States; Chief Commissioner Patrick Stevens, Counselor and Belgian Police Liaison Officer at the Embassy of Belgium; Kelley Friedgen, Senior Corporate Counsel at Genentech and Legal Advisor to the Genentech Counterfeit Prevention and Response Task Force; and Jeannie Salo, Director for Global Anti-Counterfeiting, Office of International Government Affairs at Eli Lilly and Company examined public and private sector solutions to the fast-growing falsified medications problem.  This panel was moderated by Frédéric Badey, Senior Director, International Public Affairs Coordination, Sanofi.

 
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